Time To Enjoy The Pool

Summer means fun in the sun by the pool.  Many mobile home parks have pools for the enjoyment of their residents.  It is very important that you are aware of the rules and regulations of your community regarding the use of the pool, hot tub and other facilities.

Most communities limit the use of these facilities to the residents.  For example, if a resident has a guest, guests must be accompanied by their resident adult host.   Resident cooperation helps make the swimming pool a fun place for all.

Pool rules are in place to make the community pool a fun and safe place for everyone to enjoy.  If you do not have a copy of your Park rules, be sure to ask the community manger for a copy.

Refreshing & Delicious Sparkling Lemonade

Who doesn’t love chilled lemonade on a hot Summer day? Made with club soda, this version is slightly bubbly and bursting with citrus flavor.  ENJOY!!

¾ Cup Sugar

½ Cup Water

¼ Cup Lemon Peel Strips (about 1 ½ lemons)

¾ Cup Lemon Juice

1 Cup Club Soda, Chilled

In a small saucepan, heat sugar and water over medium heat until sugar is dissolved, stirring frequently. Stir in lemon strips. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Cool slightly.   Transfer to a pitcher. Stir in lemon juice; cover and refrigerate until chilled. Discard lemon strips. Stir in club soda. Serve over ice. Yield: 2-1/2 cups.

Source:  https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/sparkling-lemonade

Summer Safety Tips for You and Your Family

As Summer approaches, it is good to be reminded of some Summer Safety Tips that will help keep you and your family safe while enjoying the warmer months.

Have a Sun Safe Summer:

It’s natural to want to get out in the sun during warm Summer days.  It should also be second nature to take steps to protect your skin from the sun when you go outside.  Ultra violet rays are the #1 cause of skin cancer.  Too much exposure can also cause sunburn, eye damage and premature wrinkles.  But shielding your skin with clothing, broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher and staying in the shade, can help lower your risk.

Sunscreen should be applied 15-30 minutes before going outdoors.  Water Resistant does not mean Waterproof.  No sunscreens are waterproof or sweatproof.   One ounce should be used

initially, and then reapplied every 2 hours if swimming or sweating.   Hats, sunglasses and protective clothing with UPF (ultraviolet protection factor) serve as an extra layer of protection.

Stay Hydrated and Prevent Heat Exhaustion:

Drink Plenty of water before going outdoors, and to prevent overheating, drink plenty of fluids throughout the day even if you are not thirsty.  Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol. On extremely hot days, limit direct exposure with the sun and if possible, stay indoors during mid-day hours.  This is especially important for adults over 65 years of age whose bodies are less effective at regulating body temperature.  Wear light colored, light weight, loose fitting clothing and avoid exercising outdoors on hot days.

Stay Water Safe:

During the Summer months, people are drawn to community pools and beaches.  Larger crowds require you to be more aware of your surroundings.  Pools tend to be busy and loud allowing for a child to drown without being seen or heard.  Never let a child swim alone, and always have an adult assigned to watch the pool during parties.  In the ocean, never swim alone.  Try to swim near lifeguard stations and always pay attention to the water condition flags.  Never swim near surfers, be aware of undercurrents, shallow water & rocks, and wear swim shoes to prevent injury from hot sand and rocks.

Always Drink Responsibly:

Summer is a time for celebrating.  While enjoying the holidays, birthdays and other momentous occasions, always remember to drink responsibly.  Do not operate any motorized vehicles while drinking and most importantly, never drink and drive.

Stay Safe While Enjoying Outdoor Activities:

Hiking is a Summer favorite. Try to stick to marked trails and identify landmarks often so they can help guide you back.  Let people know where you are going and when you are likely to return.  Hike with plenty of water, sunscreen and non-perishable snacks.

If camping, remember to shake out your shoes before you put them on, you never know when a spider or scorpion will take refuge in your items.  Never go to sleep with a campfire still burning, and never keep food inside your tent, store it in your car away from sleeping campers.

Finally, on road trips and in everyday life, always remember that cars can be deadly.  NEVER leave children or pets in your vehicle.  The inside temperature of a car can quickly reach 120+ degrees.

Enjoy Your Summer, Stay Safe and Have Fun!!

Sources:

www.americancancersociety.org

www.well.blogs.nytimes.com

Another Mobile Home Burns! Will Your Insurance will Cover your Home?

On March 15, 2018 a mobile home was destroyed completely by fire in the City of Cypress, Orange County. The photos show the devastation. The man inside the home suffered burns. According to a March 15 Orange County Register report the cause of the fire is still under investigation.

Officers escorted the subject away from the residence seconds before an explosion occurred.

When a fire like this happens the first questions or comment is, “We sure hope the owner of the home was insured.” Unfortunately, the answer to this question is frequently that the home owner is either uninsured or under insured.

Fires happen. It could be your home damaged by a fire in a neighbor’s home or a huge disaster like wild fires where embers land on your roof and there is no stopping the damage and devastation that follows.

The pictures of this disaster tell the story. Don’t be caught without insurance. It is recommended that you consult with a professional who specializes in insuring mobile and manufactured homes for your insurance coverage.

The key is to have the home insured for replacement value. If you have a loan on the home and it is completely destroyed by a fire, you still owe the loan amount, plus you need to now replace the home.

The insurance coverage needed will need to cover the removal of the old, destroyed home, the preparation of the lot for the placement of a new home, payment of the mortgage and the purchase of a replacement home. This could be a considerable sum, but far better to be insured for the total loss.

Thinking of selling your home?

Before selling your home, be sure everything is in order regarding the registration of the home with the State of California, that taxes are all paid and current, and that you are aware of the proper disclosure forms that must be provided to the buyer of your home. These forms are outlined in California Civil Code Sections 1102 and require the seller of a manufactured home to disclose information including what items are included in the home, significant defects/malfunctions, hazardous materials in the home, and that any room additions comply with the appropriate code. The disclosure form is far more detailed, so be sure that you are thoroughly aware of this section of the California Civil code BEFORE you put your home up for sale. You will also want to advise the on-site manager/park owners that you are selling your home so that they can provide you with additional information or procedures that will need to be followed.

Free Webinar: HUD’s Manufactured Home Dispute Resolution Program

You may have heard about the Manufactured Home Dispute Resolution Program, a resource that manufactured homeowners or prospective homeowner can use to resolve disputes regarding the correction or repair defect in manufactured homes. If you would like to be more knowledgeable about this program, there is a webinar on Tuesday, February 13th from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The webinar will teach you about how the program works, the issues handled by the program, federal disclosure requirements, and additional resources available. Upon registration, you can submit any questions you have about the program or any issues, and they will be answered by the webinar hosts. If you think of more questions after registration, you can submit them to info@huddrp.net by Tuesday, February 6.

You must register to participate in the webinar. Visit the link below to register, and contact Christine Biddlecombe at cbiddlecombe@savangroup.com for any questions about the webinar.

Registration: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2950621205121298945

Resource: https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/housing/rmra/mhs/mhdrp

Mobile home owners face hidden risks

Written By: Ben Metcalf – Nov 10, 2017

More than 500,000 California families find their path to affordable home ownership through the purchase of a mobile home or manufactured home, but an estimated one-third lack proper title and registration – putting each of those homeowners at risk.

In an effort to encourage all mobile and manufactured homeowners to secure proper title, the state is offering a limited-time program that waives many back fees and taxes.

Many homeowners purchased their property thinking they had all the proper documents, but later found out that the prior owner left them with unpaid fees and taxes. The state program offers a way out of that problem.

There are lots of good reasons to make sure mobile homes are properly titled and registered:

– Only mobile home owners with proper title and registration can buy flood and fire insurance. Sadly, we recently saw more than 200 mobile homes destroyed in devastating fires in Northern California – many of which did not have proper title and registration, and consequently no fire insurance.

– Registration helps owners to sell or legally transfer title to heirs – a spouse, child, or another loved one.

– Many home-improvement projects require a building permit, which can only be obtained if you have proper title and registration.

– More utility companies are offering financial assistance. However, participation requires current title and registration.

The state fee and tax waiver program — Register Your Mobile home California — waives certain state and local fees and taxes that could result in thousands of dollars of savings for a mobile home owner.

In the weeks and months ahead, the California Department of Housing and Community Development will work with mobile home park owners, community groups, and others to get the word out that help is available.

To help spread the word, we have created an easy-to-use website – RegisterYourMobilehomeCA.org – where homeowners to get the information they need to waive fees and taxes and secure title.

We also have a toll-free number – (800) 952-8356 – homeowners can call to receive assistance. English- and Spanish-speaking representatives are standing by, and interpreter services for other languages are available.

We urge all unregistered California mobile home and manufactured homeowners who haven’t registered their homes to do so as soon as possible. It is an important way to protect their most important asset and ensure their homes are safe and secure now and in the future.

Ben Metcalf, Director

California Department of Housing and Community Development.

Safety Tips for Your Home During Holiday Seasons

We are approaching a very joyous time of the year – whether you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, or the New Year, it is a time to celebrate by gathering with family and friends. With many gatherings and parties, there’s usually a grand display of foods that someone has worked very hard to put together.  Whether you are given the opportunity to host a party for the first time, or you have been doing it for many years, it helps to take a minute and review some safety tips.

According to Foremost Insurance and the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), Thanksgiving and Christmas are known for cooking-related home fires. You can imagine millions of people cooking in the kitchen, many of them pressed for time and stressed out from wanting to make everything perfect. It’s more than likely that just a few carelessness or inattention in the kitchen will lead to big disasters. Although the following tips were written to advise people for holiday feasts, you can apply these same tips for whenever you are cooking in the kitchen:

  1. Make sure that no flammable objects, such as kitchen towels, oven mitts, paper towels, hot pads, and food packaging, are away from your stove top. If you are rushing or not fully paying attention, it’s easy to forget about where you put these objects. It helps to clean off your kitchen counter as you cook so that you have space to put your kitchen tools and can keep track of where things are.
  2. Stay in the kitchen at all times if you have something boiling, frying, grilling, or broiling. If you are an experienced cook at home, you probably think that you can leave the kitchen for a short period of time. But why risk having a tragic accident in your kitchen right before an important gathering? Always keep an eye on your stove, or turn it off if you need to leave the kitchen.
  3. Always check on your foods that are simmering, baking, or roasting. Just because your pumpkin cheesecake recipe states to bake for one hour and to not open the oven door while it’s baking, you can still look into the oven every now and then to make sure that everything is going smoothly. If you are a forgetful cook, always use a timer, especially for dishes that calls for long hours of cooking.
  4. Don’t use the stove if you are feeling sleepy or have consumed alcohol. It’s very easy to start cooking and fall asleep while you are waiting. Pass the torch to someone else who is alert and wide awake to do the cooking.

It’s very easy for anyone to be a victim to kitchen disasters, especially when you are busy entertaining guests or if you are preparing everything by yourself. Make sure you stay safe by reading the Foremost Insurance article as well as visiting the National Fire Protection Agency website.

Resources: http://blog.foremost.com/thanksgiving-fires-turkey-fryers-and-safety-choirs.asp

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/cooking.html

Is Your Mobile Home Level?

Many homeowners choose mobile home living as a long-term housing arrangement. There are many reasons for choosing the mobile home lifestyle including affordability, community setting, and convenience. One major reason, especially for seniors, is the accessibility of a single-floor layout. As your mobile home ages, it becomes increasingly important to keep up with maintenance. Although the manufactured homes that are built these days are very durable and can even look like a traditional home, one of the most crucial and often overlooked necessity is re-leveling of your mobile home.

As the years pass, all manufactured homes begin to settle. This can cause problems such as creaks and leans in your floor, as well as doors not closing properly. What does all this mean? Well you can rest assured, your home is not sinking or damaged, rather it means that your home needs an adjustment.

Without regular adjustments to the level of your home, the piers underneath the home that may be constructed of non-treated wood may show wear, tear, and erosion. Bolts could become stressed and less effective, and other deterioration underneath the home may have occurred.

What is re-leveling?

Re-leveling your mobile home is simply the appropriate redistribution of the weight of your home to make it even again.

Can I re-level my own home?

Unless you have the experience and equipment necessary, this is not a do-it-yourself job. To safeguard your home and guarantee that the re-leveling is done correctly, you will need to consult a professional.

The best place to start is with the company that sold your mobile home to you. Mobile home dealers often know the most qualified contractors. Or ask a neighbor which company they used. Another way to find the right company is to search the web. But be cautious, always investigate the company’s qualifications, credentials and previous clients’ comments and reviews.

Finally, get multiple quotes in writing and ask these potential companies questions. Find out who will actually be completing the job and verify their experience and credentials and request an accurate timeline for the project so you can plan ahead.

Re-leveling may seem like a major repair, however it really is quite basic, but definitely necessary. If you plan ahead and do your research your mobile home life style can continue to be comfortable and safe for many more years to come.

Source: http://mobilehomeliving.org/understanding-mobile-home-leveling-issues/

Is Mobile Home Community Living Low-Income Housing?

In the Southern California region, there is a broad choice of housing ranging from very affordable to very expensive. Generally, multifamily rental housing, including mobile home parks, are considered to be affordable housing. However, the closer the apartments or mobile home parks are located to the beach or other desirable neighborhoods, the more expensive they are. Likewise, the farther inland or in less desirable neighborhoods, the less expensive all forms of housing become. The very same 800 square foot 1940’s bungalow located in San Bernardino will rent for a mere fraction of what it rents in Newport Beach. The real estate adage, “location, location, location” applies to all forms of housing.

Generally multi-family rental housing is considered affordable housing and mobile home parks are included in that category. It is important to note that there is a big difference between “affordable housing” and “low-income housing.” Affordable housing is available to everyone as a lifestyle choice, regardless of one’s income. It is very common to find people choosing to live in a nice apartment community or mobile home community because they like the lifestyle. It has nothing to do with whether they could afford to live in a larger or more expensive house.

Low-income housing is another type of housing entirely. To address the needs of low-income families, government has provided a variety of programs including Section 8 rent subsidy programs and other subsidized housing. To live in a subsidized low-income apartment or condominium the renter or purchaser has to meet the low-income criteria.

Cities are required to adopt housing elements identifying the types of housing in their communities. The number of single family homes, condos, apartments, mobile home parks and subsidized low-income housing is outlined in these housing elements. Many cities and counties have adopted zoning requirements that require developers to include affordable housing within their housing developments or to pay the jurisdiction a fee for affordable housing.

Apartments and mobile home parks are not low-income housing. They provide a rental housing choice that, depending on the location, can also be an affordable housing choice.